Grades 1-5


General and Judaic Studies For Grades 1-5

GENERAL STUDIES AT OHDS

The OHDS General Studies program not only equips students with standards-based skills, but uses inquiry and project-based learning methods to engage their curiosity, creativity and critical thinking. Through literature and social studies, students learn to read and reread complex text, search for evidence to support their interpretations and ponder multiple understandings as they participate in shared inquiry discussions. Our young mathematicians consider the many ways to solve a single problem and effectively use manipulatives, drawings and words to explain their thinking process. And whether they are First Grade engineers designing bridges, Fourth Grade inventors building circuits or Sixth Grade chemists observing water molecules, our OHDS students learn to read, write, observe, experiment, design and problem-solve like real scientists, becoming specialists in their year-long field of study.

 

English Language Arts Program

English language arts instruction integrates the learning of essential foundational skills with an inquiry-based approach that makes reading and writing come alive for students. Whether learning how to blend sounds, spell multi-syllable words or write a five-paragraph essay, the nuts and bolts of language arts are taught explicitly with many opportunities for hands-on practice and the goal of mastery in mind. From early on, students are shown that reading and writing provide exciting opportunities for independent learning and exploration, opening them up to the world of research in science, social studies and their unique areas of interest. The depth and joy of literature is approached by engaging with specially chosen short stories, poems and novels, all of which require students to question, explore and discuss. Through close examination of important moments in their own lives, students become creators of literature themselves, using language to draw us into the rich stories they have to tell.

 

Math Program

Math instruction throughout the grades focuses on developing a tangible understanding of numbers with the dual goals of computational mastery and the ability to approach real-world problems in creative ways. Through games, hands-on exploration and challenging word problems, students are both supported and encouraged to demonstrate their comprehension of mathematical concepts. Whether counting to ten, adding fractions or simplifying variable expressions, computing answers is not enough. Rather, students are asked to show their thinking, search for multiple ways to solve a problem and articulate the mathematical process with precision.

 

Science Program

Science instruction brings an inquiry-based approach, leveraging students’ natural curiosity and giving them the opportunity to explore their world through reading, research and hands-on experiences. Whether observing the decay of compost in Kindergarten, building circuits in fourth grade or researching environmental issues in sixth grade, students are encouraged to ask questions, think logically and explain their thinking with precise and descriptive language. The study of scientific topics is intentionally integrated with the English language arts curriculum, offering the students multiple opportunities to build reading, writing and discussion skills within the context of scientific knowledge-building. Project-based challenges require students to solve complex problems while employing creative thinking and the collaborative skills essential for today’s world.

 

Social Studies Program

Social studies instruction is seamlessly integrated with the English language arts curriculum and gives students in all grades the chance to appreciate and understand the richness of the human world, both present and past. Whether studying maps in second grade, exploring family immigration stories in third grade, or closely reading American slave narratives as eighth graders, students are given the opportunity to use their reading, writing and discussion skills to develop a greater understanding of their topic. Songs, poems, folktales, novels and primary texts are specially selected to build background knowledge and to create a more intimate relationship with global cultures and historical time periods. Students use their research skills to increase their understanding of specific cultures or events and produce detailed research reports to share their findings.

 

JUDAIC STUDIES AT OHDS

The Judaic Studies program at OHDS enables learners to actively connect to their tradition and to their heritage. With its concentration on “learning how to learn,” our program produces informed and confident readers of traditional Jewish texts. Our students develop comfort and fluency in Hebrew through our Hebrew immersion approach. The study of Torah, Jewish holidays and Jewish history provide students with broad Judaic literacy. Tefillah, storytelling, music, art and drama open our students to a world of wonder, awe and spiritual exploration. We aspire to provide an environment where Judaism is not bound by school walls and class times, but is a sum of our collective experience as a people – then and there, here and now. May we be able to educate a next generation that will continue to believe in and work towards Ahavat Yisrael, Achdut, Shalom and Torah U’Mitzvot, continuously strengthening our relationship with HaKadosh Baruch Hu.

 

Hebrew Program

Our heritage has brought us strength, unity, and spiritual and cultural wealth, nurtured by the study of holy texts in written and oral traditions—Torah and Toshb’a. Our goal is to give students the necessary tools to develop skills that will allow them to “break the Sefer barrier” and to engage with the text years after they have graduated from OHDS. Towards this end, we have strived to create an environment where Hebrew is a natural occurrence. Judaic studies is taught in Hebrew in grades 1-5; in middle school, students engage in Hebrew language through the study of Israeli literature, music, current events, as well as a Judaic studies class where Hebrew is an intrinsic part of the everyday life of the student. The Hebrew language connects us in time and in space; from the lives of our ancestors to that of Jews in the 21st century today and onward.

 

Israel Focus

Israel is alive within our walls. In early grades, students are exposed to the various facets of the country, from geography to its diversity; from art and music to the holiness of its cities; from Zionist thinkers to Israel’s Declaration of Independence. In middle school, students continue to explore Israel’s society, the minorities that constitute its population, its environmental challenges and cultural manifestations; its history and aspirations.

First Grade Curriculum

First Grade Language Arts

Through songs, stories, hands-on centers activities, writing, and discussion, students:

  • Engage with the world of books, poems and songs with joy and excitement
  • Decode one and two-syllable words with predictable letter combinations
  • Demonstrate mastery of common long vowels, diphthongs, digraphs and consonant combinations and sight words
  • Read a first grade-level text with fluency, accuracy and comprehension
  • Ask and answer questions about main ideas and details related to a read-aloud text
  • Respond to open-ended interpretive questions about a read-aloud text and give evidence from the text
  • Use letter combinations to represent long vowel sounds, blends and digraph sounds and correctly spell common first grade sight words
  • Write three or more complete and related sentences on a given topic
  • Correctly use capitals, periods, question marks and exclamation points
  • Through writing, state and provide evidence for an opinion
  • Write stories that include details, temporal words and an ending
  • Engage in the complete writing process including planning, drafting, editing, revising and publishing

 

First Grade Math

Using a hands-on approach through the Singapore Math curriculum, students:

  • Explore the world of numbers with curiosity and perseverance
  • Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction
  • Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction
  • Add and subtract within 20
  • Work with addition and subtraction equations
  • Extend the counting sequence
  • Demonstrate a solid understanding of place value through the hundreds
  • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract
  • Measure lengths indirectly and iterating length units
  • Tell and write time
  • Represent and interpret data
  • Reason with shapes and attributes

 

First Grade Science

Through hands-on experiments, field trips, reading, discussion and construction, students:

  • Build scientific information and thinking skills through the exploration of physics and engineering
  • Learn about solids, liquids, gasses, motion, Rube Goldberg machines, simple machines and more
  • Develop an understanding of Newton’s laws of motion and demonstrate how these principles apply in our world
  • Name, describe and compare simple machines and explain their impact on our lives
  • Show an understanding of the scientific process as it relates to designing solutions to simple engineering challenges
  • Describe the connections between pieces of scientific information or ideas read in a text
  • Use precise and descriptive language in discussion and in writing to explain scientific processes and observations

 

First Grade Social Studies

Through songs, stories, art, experiential learning and discussion, students:

  • Learn about our world with respect and thoughtfulness
  • Learn about the relationship between individuals, communities and the world
  • Draw and label simple maps of familiar places
  • Read about homes and houses in different countries and cultures
  • Learn about unique architectural landmarks from around the world
  • Participate in classroom community through daily meetings and discussions

 

First Grade Hebrew (Ivrit)

  • Students become independent Hebrew readers.
  • Students start writing in cursive Hebrew.
  • Students read, reflect on and discuss Hebrew language character development in stories.

 

First Grade Torah Study (Limud Torah) in Kitah Alef

  • Students internalize the idea behind the name of the parasha.
  • Students explore the connection between one parasha and the next.
  • Students develop empathy with the personalities they meet in the Chumash.
  • Students examine the meaning of kedusha (holiness) through the study of parashat hashavuah.

 

First Grade Jewish Studies (Limudei Kodesh)

  • Students articulate the function of ritual objects within the holidays.
  • Students relate the use of ritual objects to passages of the Torah.
  • Students prepare themselves for Shabbat with songs and stories about its rituals and traditions.
  • Students learn about, compare and contrast, create, and incorporate the learning of ritual objects. and symbols of the Jewish holidays into their personal celebrations.

 

First Grade Prayers and Blessings (Tefillot U’Vrachot)

  • Students learn the morning prayers (Shacharit).
  • Students gain a deeper understanding of basic morning prayers and their connection to the events. within our day, from morning through night time.
  • Students learn to appreciate the rituals involved in their tradition.
  • Students connect ritual objects to their function and time.
  • Students receive their first siddur at Chagigat HaSiddur.

 

Middot

  • Students practice acts of chesed with each other.
  • Students describe the importance of patience (savlanut) when working and playing within a community of friends.
  • Students discuss examples of what it means to be a good friend.

 

Am Yisrael

    • Students design maps of important places for them.
    • Students identify the map of Israel.
    • Students learn about the main cities in Israel.
    • Students recite the prayer for Medinat Yisrael as part of their morning services.

Second Grade Curriculum

Second Grade Language Arts

Through songs, stories, hands-on centers activities, writing, and discussion students:

      • Engage with the world of literature, poetry and informational text with joy and excitement
      • Demonstrate mastery of two and three-syllable word decoding including common prefixes, suffixes, compound words and second grade level sight words
      • Read a second grade level text with fluency, accuracy and comprehension
      • Ask and answer questions about details in both read-aloud and independently-read text
      • Respond to open-ended interpretive questions about a read-aloud text and give evidence from the text
      • Use common letter combinations to correctly spell most one and two-syllable words and accurately spell common second grade sight words
      • Write 3-4 sentence paragraphs that introduce a topic and give details
      • Accurately use capitals, periods, question marks, exclamation marks and commas
      • Recount personal experiences using descriptive details and colorful word choice
      • Use linking words (because, also, and, etc.) to connect opinion with evidence
      • Research a topic, take notes and produce a multi-paragraph original report
      • Write stories with a clear beginning, middle and end that includes a moral
      • Engage in the complete writing process including planning, drafting, editing, revising and publishing

 

Second Grade Math

Using a hands-on approach through the Singapore Math curriculum, students:

      • Explore the world of numbers with curiosity and perseverance
      • Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction
      • Add and subtract within 20
      • Work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication
      • Demonstrate solid understanding of place value through the thousands
      • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract
      • Measure and estimate lengths in standard units
      • Relate addition and subtraction to length
      • Tell time and count money
      • Represent and interpret data
      • Reason with shapes and their attributes

 

Second Grade Science

Through hands-on exploration, field trips, reading, writing and discussion, students:

      • Build scientific information and thinking skills through the exploration of geology and paleontology
      • Learn about the layers of the earth, volcanoes, landforms, fossils, dinosaurs and more
      • Name, describe and compare some of Earth’s most common landforms
      • Show a beginning understanding of how scientists use clues from the earth to develop theories about the past
      • Read informational scientific text to collect information, learn processes and understand new concepts
      • Describe the connection between scientific ideas based on information learned from a text – for example, reading to learn how fossils are formed
      • Write about scientific processes, observations and information using precise vocabulary and specific evidence to support conclusions
      • Conduct independent research to learn in-depth about a specific dinosaur

 

Second Grade Social Studies

Through reading, writing, hands-on activities, guest speakers and discussion, students:

      • Learn about our world with respect and thoughtfulness
      • Study different kinds of maps and describe their features and uses
      • Learn how humans organize time into units
      • Conduct in depth research on a landform of their choice
      • Learn how people work the land and take care of the earth
      • Compare common themes in folktales from around the world
      • Participate in classroom community through weekly meetings and discussions

 

Second Grade Hebrew (Ivrit)

In second grade, students begin to develop more independence as learners.

      • Students read independently.
      • Students write independently.
      • Students initiate a Hebrew exchange with their classmates and teachers.
      • Students show curiosity and initiative towards learning Hebrew.

 

Second Grade Jewish Studies (Limudei Kodesh)

      • Students focus on the relationship between G-d and people.
      • Students analyze the effects of rituals and ritual objects on the celebration of the holidays and their impact on them.
      • Students differentiate between halachot and minhagim of holidays.
      • Students identify a point of connection between the holiday and him/herself.

 

Second Grade Torah Study (Limud Torah)

      • Chumash is introduced as a discrete discipline in second grade.
      • Students interact with the text in the Chumash, mostly through the use of a Chumashon – an adapted, user-friendly text.
      • Students investigate the idea that there is order in the world through the study of Bereshit.
      • Student develop a sense of responsibility towards his/her environment.
      • Students develop a sense of partnership with those around them.
      • Students receive their Chumash at their Chagigat HaChumash.

 

Second Grade Prayers and Blessings (Tefillot U’Vrachot)

      • Students deepen the understanding of themselves as spiritual beings.
      • Students create kedusha within their Tefillah environment.
      • Students develop an understanding of the mitzvoth in connection with Adam LaMakom and Adam LeChavero.
      • Students show respect to their classmates and to Tefillah.

 

Second Grade Middot

      • Students learn that there is order in creation.
      • Students learn to appreciate the value of seder/order in the world.
      • Students integrate the midah of Seder (order) into their lives.
      • Students create an orderly environment in their classrooms and within their belongings.
      • Students develop an understanding of the concept of Kol Yisrael Arevim Ze La’Zeh (Am Yisrael is responsible for each other).

 

Second Grade Am Yisrael

      • Students relate the symbols of Israel to particular moments of the history of Am Yisrael.
      • Students articulate how symbols are able to contain a message, a dream or a goal.

Third Grade Curriculum

Third Grade Language Arts

Through poetry, stories, hands-on centers activities, writing and discussion, students:

      • Engage with the world of literature, poetry and informational text with joy and excitement
      • Decode multi-syllabic words and grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words
      • Read third grade level text with fluency and comprehension
      • Describe characters in a story and how their actions contribute to the sequence of events
      • Compare and contrast the themes, settings and plots of stories written by the same author
      • Participate in shared inquiry discussions, responding to open-ended interpretive questions using evidence from the text
      • Report on the main idea and details from informational text
      • Correctly spell common sight words, compound words and words with basic prefixes and suffixes
      • Write simple, compound and complex sentences with correct subject/verb agreement
      • Write a five-sentence paragraph with topic sentence, supporting details and concluding sentence
      • Write persuasive letters that state a clear opinion and use linking phrases (therefore, for example, etc.) to connect opinion with reasons given
      • Write both real and imagined narratives with a clear sequence of events, using dialogue and rich descriptions that bring the reader into the story
      • Research a topic, take notes and produce a multi-page original report that provides facts on many subtopics and uses descriptive writing to grab the reader’s attention
      • Engage in the complete writing process including planning, drafting, editing, revising and publishing

 

Third Grade Math

Using a hands-on approach through the Singapore Math curriculum, students:

      • Explore the world of numbers with curiosity and perseverance
      • Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division
      • Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division
      • Multiply and divide within 100
      • Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic
      • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic
      • Show understanding of fractions as numbers
      • Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, volume and mass
      • Represent and interpret data
      • Understand concepts of area and relate area to multiplication and addition
      • Recognize perimeter as an attribute of plane figures and distinguish between linear and area measures

 

Third Grade Science

Through hands-on projects, field trips, reading, writing and discussion, students:

      • Build scientific information and thinking skills through the exploration of zoology
      • Learn about earth’s biomes, natural defenses, food webs, animal classification, adaptation, extinction, and predation
      • Name, describe and compare Earth’s biomes
      • Explain and give examples of how animals are adapted to their environments
      • Read informational scientific text to collect information, learn processes and understand new concepts
      • Describe the relationship between scientific ideas – for example, predator and prey or habitat and animal defense
      • Write about scientific processes, observations and information using precise vocabulary and specific evidence to support conclusions
      • Conduct independent research to learn in-depth about a specific animal

 

Third Grade Social Studies

Through reading, writing, interviews, hands-on activities, field trips and discussion, students:

      • Learn about our world with respect and thoughtfulness
      • Create a detailed personal timeline with descriptive narratives that bring small moments to life
      • Interview parents and grandparents to develop an understanding of personal family history
      • Describe the relationship between historical events by writing a family immigration story
      • Read and write biographies to learn about the ways in which an individual can impact history
      • Name and locate Earth’s continents on a map
      • Participate in classroom community through weekly meetings and discussions

 

Third Grade Hebrew (Ivrit)

      • Students produce Hebrew writing samples that demonstrate their ability to organize their thoughts in writing.
      • Students respond in Hebrew to questions and prompts from classmates.
      • Students conjugates verbs in the past tense.

 

Third Grade Jewish Studies (Limudei Kodesh)

      • Students examine how the actions we take can impact our spiritual growth, as seen through the halachot and minhagim of the holidays.
      • Students identify examples of important actions taken by the “heroes” of the different holiday stories and Torah readings.
      • Students investigate the role G-d plays in each one of the stories.

 

Third Grade Torah Study (Limud Torah)

      • Students compare and contrast the different experiences of our ancestors.
      • Students analyze the motivations of the avot for the actions taken in the texts studied.
      • Students describe the importance of establishing a goal and being supported in the process of reaching that goal, as seen in the narrative of these parshiot.

 

Third Grade Prayers and Blessings (Tefillot U’Vrachot)

      • Students gain a deeper appreciation for the wonders of the world through prayer.
      • Students learn about the different brachot for different occasions.
      • Students deepen their understanding of the Shema.
      • Students show respect and appreciation for Tefillah.
      • Students can differentiate between kodesh l’chol.

 

Third Grade Middot

      • Students give examples of decisiveness (harizut) from his/her study of holidays and Chumash.
      • Students demonstrate through their own actions the importance of harizut.
      • Students learn how to ask for help and advice when needed.
      • Students show humility (anavah) in his/her relationship with peers and teachers.

 

Third Grade Am Yisrael

      • Students identify the wonders of Israel through the study of the four holy cities: Jerusalem, Tzfat, Hebron and Tiberias.
      • Students explore places considered holy in Israel and explain what makes them holy.

Fourth Grade Curriculum

Fourth Grade Language Arts

Through poetry, novels, short stories, writing and discussion, students:

      • Engage with the world of literature, poetry and informational text with joy and excitement
      • Decode unfamiliar multi-syllabic words, both in context and out of context
      • Read fourth grade text with fluency, accuracy and comprehension
      • Describe the rise and fall of action in a novel
      • Trace a character’s development from the beginning to the end of the novel
      • Participate in shared-inquiry discussions, responding to open-ended interpretive questions using evidence from the text
      • Summarize main idea and details from informational text
      • Correctly spell common sight words, compound words and words with common prefixes and suffixes
      • Recognize and correct fragment and run-on sentences
      • Plan and write a simple five-paragraph descriptive essay with introduction, body and conclusion
      • Research and write multi-paged reports that provide detailed information on many sub-topics, provide clear introduction and conclusion and use vocabulary specific to the research topic
      • Write personal and fictional narratives that include sensory details, dialogue, creative word choice and a variety of sentence structures to bring the reader into the story
      • Engage in the complete writing process including planning, drafting, editing, revising and publishing

 

Fourth Grade Math

Using a hands-on approach through the Singapore Math curriculum, students:

      • Explore the world of numbers with curiosity and perseverance
      • Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems
      • Show familiarity with factors and multiples
      • Generate and analyze mathematical patterns
      • Generalize place value understanding for multi-digit whole numbers
      • Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic
      • Show understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering
      • Build fractions from unit fractions
      • Show understanding of decimal notation for fractions and compare decimal fractions
      • Solve problems involving measurement and conversion of measurements from larger to smaller unit
      • Represent and interpret data
      • Measure angles and classify shapes by properties of their lines and angles

 

Fourth Grade Science

Through hands-on experiments, projects, reading, writing and discussion, students will:

      • Build scientific information and thinking skills through the exploration of energy, magnetism and creating inventions
      • Learn about light, sound, energy, magnetism, circuits, inventors and robotics
      • Name, describe and compare forms of energy
      • Bring learning to life by building a circuit, designing a musical instrument and assembling a robot
      • Plan and demonstrate a simple robotic program
      • Conduct independent research to learn in-depth about a specific inventor
      • Read informational scientific text to collect information, learn processes and understand new concepts
      • Explain scientific ideas based on information gleaned from text
      • Write about scientific processes, observations and information using precise vocabulary and specific evidence to support conclusions

 

Fourth Grade Social Studies

Through reading, writing, simulations, hands-on activities, discussions and field trips, students:

      • Learn about our world with respect and thoughtfulness
      • Study the unique features of California native tribes and write an in-depth research report on one specific tribe
      • Learn about the California Gold Rush by participating in a multi-week simulation and reading the novel By the Great Horn Spoon
      • Demonstrate a solid grasp of California geography
      • Take notes from a social studies textbook and maintain a historical timeline of California history
      • Explain historical events and concepts based on specific information from a text
      • Compare and contrast first and second-hand accounts of the same historical event
      • Participate in classroom community through weekly meetings and discussions

 

Fourth Grade Hebrew (Ivrit)

      • Students respond to and reflect on material read in class through writing.
      • Students share their writing and develop peer-editing skills.
      • Students share experiences with each other verbally and in writing.
      • Students develop story-telling skills, working together in chevruta (study groups).
      • Students conjugate verbs in the future tense.

 

Fourth Grade Judaic Studies (Limudei Kodesh)

      • Students examine the relationship between Adam L’Chavero and the importance of community within the Jewish tradition and history.
      • Students analyze the diverse encounters in Jewish sources and examine their relevance in teaching us about the relationship between Adam L’Chavero.
      • Students apply their understanding of the relationship between Adam L’chavero to their everyday lives at school.
      • Students explain how halacha contributes to the building of a community and how a community supports Jewish practice.

 

Fourth Grade Torah Study (Limud Torah)

      • Students analyze the impact that the actions of our forefathers have had on the development of Am Yisrael (ma’aseh avot siman le-banim).
      • Students study the development of Yosef’s character in detail.
      • Students examine Yosef’s complex trajectory and distill the different choices Yosef made through his life.

 

Fourth Grade Prayers and Blessings (Tefillot U’Vrachot)

      • Students engage in conversations about G-d, kedusha (holiness) and ruchaniut (spirituality).
      • Students help create a makom kadosh in their classroom environment.
      • Students examine the Amida, blessing by blessing, starting with Hashem Sfatai Tiftach.

 

Fourth Grade Middot

      • Students deepen their understanding of kibud av v’em (respecting your parents).
      • Students demonstrate through their own actions their understanding of kavod.
      • Students develop ways of strengthening their classroom and school community.
      • Students show support to each other when needed.

 

Fourth Grade Am Yisrael

      • Students explore Yerushalayim by learning about its history, its kedusha and its meaning to Am Yisrael.

Fifth Grade Curriculum

Fifth Grade Language Arts

Through poetry, novels, short stories, writing and discussion, students:

      • Engage with the world of literature, poetry and informational text with joy and excitement
      • Read fifth grade level text at 150 words correct per minute by June
      • Decode unfamiliar multi-syllabic words, both in context and out of context
      • Examine the characters and events in a story to show a pattern or overarching theme
      • Describe and give examples for how a narrator’s point of view influences how events are described
      • Correctly spell most sight words, compound words and more challenging prefixes and suffixes (ture, tion, cive, etc.)
      • Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense
      • Plan and write a simple five-paragraph literary essay that clearly states and backs up an opinion using quotes and textual evidence
      • Research and write multi-page reports that provide detailed information on many sub-topics and include clear introduction and conclusion, as well as vocabulary specific to the research topic
      • Write personal and fictional narratives that include sensory details, dialogue, creative word choice and a variety of sentence structures to bring the reader into the story and show responses of characters to situations
      • Write poems that use alliteration, simile, metaphor, humor, rhyme and rich descriptive language
      • Engage in the complete writing process including planning, drafting, editing, revising and publishing

 

Fifth Grade Math

Using a hands-on approach through the Singapore Math curriculum, students:

      • Explore the world of numbers with curiosity and perseverance
      • Write and interpret numerical expressions
      • Analyze patterns and relationship between numbers
      • Perform operations with multi-digit whole numbers and with decimals to hundredths
      • Use equivalent fractions as a strategy to add and subtract fractions
      • Apply previous understandings of multiplication and division to fractions
      • Convert like measurement units within a given measurement system
      • Represent and interpret data
      • Relate volume to multiplication and addition
      • Graph points on the coordinate plane to solve real-world and mathematical problems
      • Classify two-dimensional figures into categories based on their properties

 

Fifth Grade Science

Through hands-on experiments, projects, field trips, reading, writing and discussion, students:

      • Build scientific information and thinking skills through the exploration of meteorology
      • Learn about the atmosphere, the sun, clouds, weather instruments, air pressure, extreme weather and more
      • Name, describe and explain the factors that impact Earth’s weather system
      • Collect, graph and interpret scientific data
      • Explain the relationship between scientific concepts based on textual information – for example, how planetary movement is connected to Earth’s weather systems
      • Conduct independent research to learn-in depth about a specific form of extreme weather
      • Read scientific text to collect information, learn processes and understand new concepts
      • Write about scientific processes, observations and information using precise vocabulary and specific evidence to support conclusions

 

Fifth Grade Social Studies

Through reading, writing, simulations, hands-on activities, discussions and field trips, students:

      • Learn about our world with respect and thoughtfulness
      • Study the people, cultures and events leading up to the formation of the American colonies
      • Learn about early colonial life
      • Read and discuss current events related to American history or government
      • Conduct in-depth research on an American state and create a power point presentation and thorough report to share with the class
      • Demonstrate a solid grasp of U.S geography
      • Take notes from a social studies textbook
      • Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic – for example, comparing Native American reports of colonization with depictions within the textbook
      • Participate in classroom community through weekly meetings and discussions

 

Fifth Grade Hebrew (Ivrit)

      • Students explore Jewish history through Hebrew texts.
      • Students are introduced to Israeli literature.
      • Students identify parts of speech in every text they study (Mishna, Chumash, history and literature).
      • Students engage in peer-editing skills.
      • Students continue to work on their reading fluency and reading comprehension.

 

Fifth Grade Judaic Studies (Limudei Kodesh)

      • Students examine the impact place and time have in the development of halacha.
      • Students are introduced to the study of Mishna.
      • Students compare and contrast different minhagim (customs) in different Jewish communities.
      • Students analyze what has changed and what has not changed throughout history.

 

Fifth Grade Torah Study (Limud Torah – Sefer Shmot, from Shmot-Yitro)

      • Students describe the development of Am Yisrael as a nation.
      • Students assess the importance of trusting leadership in moments of transition.
      • Students identify patterns within the text and learn to derive meaning from the interpretation of these patterns.
      • Students examine the relationship between people and G-d (between Adam La’Makom) in the narratives of Sefer Shmot.

 

Fifth Grade Prayers and Blessings (Tefillot U’Vrachot)

      • Students develop language to explore and articulate the concepts of emuna (faith), ahava (love) and kedusha (holiness).
      • Students help create a makom kadosh in their classroom environment.
      • Students explore the meaning of miracles, then and now.

 

Fifth Grade Middot

      • Students demonstrate the ability to be a good listener.
      • Students strive to speak the truth (emet).
      • Students support each other when needed.
      • Students act with humbleness (anavah).

 

Fifth Grade Am Yisrael

      • Students compare and contrast the different edot (communities) that comprise Am Yisrael.
      • Students develop an understanding of what makes Am Yisrael, Am Echad (Jewish Nation, One Nation).

What People Say

  • The essence of the education OHDS provides is brilliantly reflected in the character and values of its students and graduates. I can't imagine a better foundation from which to grow and succeed.

    Rochelle Shapell, Parent of two OHDS graduates and OHDS Founding Board Member

  • The OHDS dream unfolds daily through the lives of the school's students and teachers. Every moment at the school is an opportunity to connect, learn, and grow.

    Rabbi Yonatan Cohen, OHDS parent and Spiritual leader of Congregation Beth Israel

  • OHDS has become more than a school, it’s our community and neighborhood. The focus on educating the whole child carries over to an investment in the health and welfare of each child, family and staff member.

    Catherine Shachat, OHDS alumni parent and former OHDS Board of Directors President

  • I love the fact that my children begin each day with prayer, engage in deep Torah study, speak Hebrew like an Israeli, and receive an excellent secular education. We appreciate how OHDS embraces every child.

    Elissa Kittner, OHDS parent and President of the Board

  • More than just a school, OHDS is a family, where each student is seen as our crown jewel - each cultivating a personal, passionate and serious Jewish identity and a commitment to join the Jewish journey as life long learners.

    Rabbi Yonatan Cohen, OHDS parent and Spiritual leader of Congregation Beth Israel

  • Our children are learning their Judaism from the ground up. There is no ambivalence.

    Judy Chun, OHDS Parent

  • OHDS has already given my children a strong sense of themselves as Jews living Jewish lives. This is no small thing in the modern world.

    Jodi Tharan, former OHDS Parent

  • OHDS students are constantly exposed to the new ways of approaching a variety of subject matters. They are encouraged to think critically and really explore and understand the material that they are learning and the world around them.

    Leslie Edelman, Past President and current Board Member, OHDS parent

  • It's not just about love of Israel and learning Hebrew. Our Kindergartner now sings "G-d bless America" with the same enthusiasm as she does songs about "Apples and Honey" and is recognizing letters and words in both languages.

    Dan Cohen, Former President of the Board of Directors and parent of two OHDS students

  • OHDS is more than a school and more than a community to me. It is really a family. The teachers are so loving and caring. They want each child to succeed with a deep thought of benefiting the whole Jewish community.

    Adi Yaron Schaker, former OHDS Parent

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